Film Screening: Free Angela & All Political Prisoners
May
7
7:00 pm19:00

Film Screening: Free Angela & All Political Prisoners

Shola Lynch’s documentary about Angela Davis, the activist and beacon of counterculture radicalism, is a snappily edited, archivally wallpapered recollection of fearless behavior in the face of an antsy establishment. But it’s equally significant as a pointed act of retelling.

The focal point of “Free Angela and All Political Prisoners” — Ms. Davis’s trial for her role in the deadly 1970 Marin County, Calif., courtroom takeover — will not yield left-field revelations to anyone familiar with this era. But Ms. Lynch, who directed a 2004 look at another forceful female black leader in “Chisholm ’72: Unbought and Unbossed,” interviews Ms. Davis and her associates for a vivid portrait of a time.

“Free Angela” sketches out its subject’s graduate education in Europe, early support for the Black Panthers and aborted career as an assistant professor of philosophy at the University of California, Los Angeles, before chronicling the trial and dramatic related events, including Ms. Davis’s weeks as a fugitive and 1972 acquittal. The stands taken by many involved lend a stirring idealistic drive to the film. Ms. Lynch rarely fans out from a supportive viewpoint of Ms. Davis’s actions or ideas, though she dwells on Ms. Davis’s passionate letters to the Black Panther and prison inmate George Jackson, whose freedom was the goal of the courtroom takeover.

Ms. Davis, today approaching 70, cannot be contained by what is going on around her. She retains an elegantly barbed wit and remains a resonant speaker. Although “Free Angela” approaches hagiography, Ms. Davis supplies a certain spark simply with her presence.


This film screening is part of our Spring/Summer 2017 film programming schedule. Stay tuned for our monthly screenings which aim to highlight women's achievements in global cinema. All screenings are by donation; popcorn and beverages will be provided.
Programmed by Yaz Ebrahi.

Max Dashu: Witch Hunts and The Cultural Legacies of Misogynist Persecution
May
13
7:30 pm19:30

Max Dashu: Witch Hunts and The Cultural Legacies of Misogynist Persecution

  • Fletcher Challenge Theatre

The early modern Terror of witch-hunting was the crucible of modern "Western Civilization." Its impact on women's freedom—speech, mobility, professions, bodies, sexuality—was profound. Yet witch hunts have become a metaphor without their own significance ever being understood digested. Females, the old, disabled, poor, queer, and cultural minorities were targeted as "devil-worshippers." 

Film Screening: The Watermelon Woman
May
28
7:00 pm19:00

Film Screening: The Watermelon Woman

The Watermelon Woman is a 1996 feature film by filmmaker Cheryl Dunye about Cheryl, a young black lesbian working a day job in a video store while trying to make a film about a black actress from the 1930s known for playing the stereotypical "mammy" roles relegated to black actresses during the period. It was the first feature film directed by a black lesbian.

The film tells the story of Cheryl, a 25-year-old filmmaker (played by the director herself), whom one can reasonably assume is a pseudo-fictional Dunye. Cheryl spends many of her days alongside her best friend Tamara (Valarie Walker) in Philadelphia as a video store clerk while moonlighting as an independent filmmaker. Desiring to make a film but without a subject, she stumbles upon the story of a mysterious Black actress from the race films of the 30s and 40s (the early films made by Black filmmakers with a mostly Black cast, for Black audiences), credited only as "The Watermelon Woman." Voracious interest leads Cheryl to discover the name of the (fictional) actress — Fae Richards — and her relationship with a famed director of her time, a white woman named Martha Page.


This film screening is part of our Spring/Summer 2017 film programming schedule. Stay tuned for our monthly screenings which aim to highlight women's achievements in global cinema. All screenings are by donation; popcorn and beverages will be provided.
Programmed by Yaz Ebrahi.

Film Screening: Anita Speaking Truth to Power
Jun
25
7:00 pm19:00

Film Screening: Anita Speaking Truth to Power

An entire country watched as a poised, beautiful African-American woman sat before a Senate committee of 14 white men and with a clear, unwavering voice recounted the repeated acts of sexual harassment she had endured while working with U.S. Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas. Anita Hill's graphic testimony was a turning point for gender equality in the U.S. and ignited a political firestorm about sexual harassment and power in the workplace that resonates still today. 

Against a backdrop of sex, politics, and race, Anita: Speaking Truth to Power reveals the story of a woman who has empowered millions to stand up for equality and justice. Directed by Academy Award®-winning filmmaker Freida Mock, the film celebrates Anita Hill's legacy and provides a rare glimpse into her private life and career. 


This film screening is part of our Spring/Summer 2017 film programming schedule. Stay tuned for our monthly screenings which aim to highlight women's achievements in global cinema. All screenings are by donation; popcorn and beverages will be provided.
Programmed by Yaz Ebrahi.

Film Screening: Cameraperson
Jul
30
7:00 pm19:00

Film Screening: Cameraperson

Cameraperson is a 2016 autobiographical collage documentary film. The film is an account by director Kirsten Johnson about her life and career as a cinematographer. It relies on footage shot by Johnson across the years in numerous different countries.

Adocumentary film-maker and cinematographer for 25 years, Kirsten Johnson uses clips from her vast body of work to create what she describes as a “memoir”. But this fascinating collage is more than that – it’s an interrogation of the relationship between the person behind the camera and the one in front of it; it’s an insight into the struggle between impartiality and the urge to intervene (we hear Johnson’s muttered prayers as a Bosnian toddler plays with an axe; we hear her cry along with a young woman at an abortion clinic). And although we only see Johnson’s face once, briefly, it’s a detailed self-portrait of an extraordinary woman.


This film screening is part of our Spring/Summer 2017 film programming schedule. Stay tuned for our monthly screenings which aim to highlight women's achievements in global cinema. All screenings are by donation; popcorn and beverages will be provided.
Programmed by Yaz Ebrahi.

Film Screening: Le Bonheur
Aug
27
7:00 pm19:00

Film Screening: Le Bonheur

Le Bonheur ("Happiness") is a 1965 French drama film directed by Agnès Varda. The film is associated with the French New Wave and won two awards at the 15th Berlin International Film Festival, including the Jury Grand Prix. The film's notable colours resulted from the creation of a new colour negative because the original had faded during production.

François, a young carpenter working for his uncle, lives a comfortable and happy life in his marriage to his wife named Thérèse with which he has two seemingly perfect children, Pierrot and Gisou. Although finding abundant “le bonheur” in his marriage and indisputably loving his wife and children, François covetously pursues an extended happiness through an affair with a woman called Émilie whom he meets on a business trip. 

Émilie knows of and skeptically inquires François about his marriage to which he soothes her with charming words and continues in his infidelity. Finding love with Émilie in the afternoon and with Thérèse at night, François’ wife questions him on a family daytrip about the new level of happiness that he has experienced lately and which she has noticed. Finding himself unable to lie to his wife, François tells Thérèse the truth about his affair, but assures her that there is “more than enough happiness to go around, nothing has changed between them.” Thérèse is found dead shortly after hearing the news of her husband’s infidelity, news that essentially shatter her very character that is determined by her ability to feed her husband’s happiness. Left a widower, François responds with a short period of mourning followed by a continued pursuit of Émilie who gladly becomes his wife and the mother of his children. In completing his family with Émilie as a replacement for his late wife Thérèse, François’ life embodies a spirit of “le bonheur” once again despite his break with morality.


This film screening is part of our Spring/Summer 2017 film programming schedule. Stay tuned for our monthly screenings which aim to highlight women's achievements in global cinema. All screenings are by donation; popcorn and beverages will be provided.
Programmed by Yaz Ebrahi.


Dyke Coffee Nights at The Vancouver Women's Library
Apr
15
7:00 pm19:00

Dyke Coffee Nights at The Vancouver Women's Library

Women, join us! Café Flâneuse invites you to the very first iteration of Dyke Coffee Nights hosted at The Vancouver Women's Library:

Where the Planet meets Le Monocle, the coffee is strong and the conversation is campy, the women are handsome and eager to talk about the personal, political and beyond.
An opportunity for women from all walks to mingle and converse, to make friends and celebrate each other!

The library will also be open and we welcome women to browse our collection. Prepare yourselves for the possibility of Dyke Trivia

Coffee and snacks by donation!

Le Monocle, Paris, 1932

Le Monocle, Paris, 1932

Film Screening: Babushkas of Chernobyl
Apr
2
7:00 pm19:00

Film Screening: Babushkas of Chernobyl

  • The Vancouver Women's Library

Film Screening: Babushkas of Chernobyl

30 years after the Chernobyl disaster, some 100 women fiercely cling to their ancestral homeland inside the radioactive “Exclusion Zone.” While most of their neighbors have long since fled and their husbands have gradually died off, this stubborn sisterhood is hanging on — even, oddly, thriving — while trying to cultivate an existence on toxic earth.

Why do they insist on living on farms that the Ukrainian government and radiation scientists have deemed uninhabitable? How do they manage to get by, isolated, in an abandoned landscape guarded by soldiers, and rife with wild animals? How has the radiation affected them these past 3 decades?

At her cottage, Hanna Zavorotyna brews homemade moonshine and slices thick chunks of salo, raw pig fat - though it is strictly forbidden to eat local food. “Starvation is what scares me, not radiation,” she says. That stark choice reveals an incredible journey the women have traveled: from Stalin’s enforced famines in the 1930s, through Nazi occupation, to nuclear disaster. Like the wolves, moose, wild boar and other wildlife not seen for decades that have come back to the abandoned forests around Chernobyl, the women of the Exclusion Zone, too, have an extraordinary story of survival, and offer a dark yet strangely affirming portrait of life post-apocalypse.


This film screening is part of our Spring/Summer 2017 film programming schedule. Stay tuned for our monthly screenings which aim to highlight women's achievements in global cinema. All screenings are by donation; popcorn and beverages will be provided.
Programmed by Yaz Ebrahi.  

Workshop and Discussion: Feminism as Witchcraft
Mar
26
12:00 pm12:00

Workshop and Discussion: Feminism as Witchcraft

  • The Vancouver Women's Library

WORKSHOP (12pm): Feminism as Witchcraft: The interconnection of female resistance to patriarchy and the reclamation of spiritual beliefs and practices that reject patriarchal religion. 

DISCUSSION (2pm): how does the popularity of witchcraft among younger women right now impact feminism as well as magical communities? We will also discuss strategy and how magick plays a role in the greater movement toward women’s liberation.

Terri Strange is a radical lesbian feminist, witch and Youtuber. She has been reading tarot for 5 years and practicing magick most of her life. Her work is eclectic and draws from working with various incarnations of the dark goddess. Her reading style focuses on uncovering personal mysteries and understanding the unconscious motivations that drive us away from our purpose.

Drop-in Tarot Readings by Terri Strange
Mar
25
11:00 am11:00

Drop-in Tarot Readings by Terri Strange

  • The Vancouver Women's Library

Terri Strange will be reading drop-in Tarot all day, suggested donation $10-$20 per reading! Come read books, sign up for a membership and get your tarot read!

Terri Strange is a radical lesbian feminist, witch and Youtuber. She has been reading tarot for 5 years and practicing magick most of her life. Her work is eclectic and draws from working with various incarnations of the dark goddess. Her reading style focuses on uncovering personal mysteries and understanding the unconscious motivations that drive us away from our purpose.

Re-opening: The Vancouver Women's Library
Mar
11
11:00 am11:00

Re-opening: The Vancouver Women's Library

  • The Vancouver Women's Library

Join The Vancouver Women's Library for our grand re-opening

We have been working tirelessly to find a better, more accessible, more secure, larger space for our growing library and are thrilled to invite you to the re-opening of our new and improved location! The time has come for you to join us throughout the day for coffee, books, feminist discourse and membership sign-up!

New address: 1255 Kingsway St.

Launch: The Vancouver Women's Library
Feb
3
7:00 pm19:00

Launch: The Vancouver Women's Library

  • 1670 Franklin Street Vancouver, BC Canada

Join us for the launch of The Vancouver Women’s Library! We are incredibly excited to open this space to the public and revive the rich herstory of women in conversation through literature.
 
We suggest a cash donation of $5 - $20 which includes a membership to access the library. No one will be turned away for lack of funds. We acknowledge the traditional custodians of these unceded Coast Salish territories and remember that under the concrete and asphalt this land, is, was, and always will be Indigenous land. We aim to reflect this in our catalogue and programming.

The Vancouver Women’s Library exclusively carries writing by women authors in a broad array of genres. We encourage intergenerational conversations through the library and believe in continuing the legacy of women-run bookstores, presses and libraries.*
 
* this is a volunteer-managed space run by woman labour
* our catalogue is ever-expanding thanks to donations
* we welcome all self-identified women and girls

DO YOU HAVE BOOKS / MAGAZINES TO DONATE? 
Bring them! We accept all titles authored by women. You’ll receive a free membership and hugs from our librarians.